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192 Jim Boone Rd
Bakersville, NC, 28705
United States

828-675-4097

The central information hub for Michael Kline Pottery, a small one man shop of pottery making in the mountains of western North Carolina.

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The Best of Sawdust and Dirt

A record of the goings on around Michael Kline Pottery!

Filtering by Tag: terra cotta warriors

2009

Michael Kline


Here it is , the New Year, and all of "us" at Sawdust and Dirt wanted to wish you a happy and prosperous New Year! My good friend, Lori Marks, was in China last year working on the Olympics. She is one of those golden friends that always sends me a Christmas card. This years card features the terracotta army all dressed up for the holidays. [Really nice work Lori.] Since I mentioned the warriors the other day, I thought I would share this card with ya'll along with my best wishes and hopes for the new year.

I haven't compiled any top ten lists or a wish list for the coming year. I wanted to do a "Best of" post but haven't taken the time, sorry. Maybe I will have time this month sometime. But soon I hope to be making pots and will share all the excitement with you if you're willing.

May your wheels continue to spin, and may you love the spin you're in.
Thank you for reading.

Going Down to Georgia

Michael Kline

We will be heading to Georgia tomorrow. Unfortunately, we won't be heading to the High Museum to see the terracotta warriors. Instead, we're going to spend New Year's Eve with some friends in Monroe where there will be much fun had by all, I'm sure. But, curiously, as I was flipping through my new book on Alabama Folk pottery I noticed these great pieces (below). They were made by John Lehman and one is in the High Museum's permanent collection. Ha! Lehman was born in Baden Germany in 1825 and made his way to the Southeast by late 1850's.
"Notwithstanding the efforts of art historians, collectors, and family descendants, tantalizingly few details of Lehman's life are known. According to family history, someone robbed and murdered him around 1883-84 while he was on a trip to Stockton, Georgia."

---excerpted from Alabama Folk Pottery, Joey Brackner, 2006, University of Alabama Press

"The[se] jugs are 22 and 23 3/4 inches in height and are ash glazed. Both are waist to head busts of an African or African American man in formal attire with large hoop earrings and a large belt buckle. Lehman's makers marks are stamped on the figure's lapels. The arms are hollow with small holes in each to prevent an explosion during the firing. These vessels have caused much excitement among collectors of southern pottery."

---from Alabama Folk Pottery, Joey Brackner, 2006, University of Alabama Press
Interesting. Coincidental?

Maybe I should add the face jug or "figural " jug to my making list when it comes time to make pots. I haven't made any since I was a college student. For some reason I have hesitated to enter the fray of face jug production , but these pieces are very interesting in a non-grotesque sort of way. After reading Dan's article about the subject of face "juggery", maybe it's OK. Never say never.

Here is another link to some Alabama pots.