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192 Jim Boone Rd
Bakersville, NC, 28705
United States

828-675-4097

The central information hub for Michael Kline Pottery, a small one man shop of pottery making in the mountains of western North Carolina.

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The Best of Sawdust and Dirt

A record of the goings on around Michael Kline Pottery!

Filtering by Tag: spheres

Throwback Thursday: Spherical

Michael Kline

It's Friday here in NC, but it must be Thursday somewhere, right? Here is a series of spherical pots(?) from 2010.
pottery technique round spherical closed form potter's wheel

pottery technique round spherical closed form potter's wheel

pottery technique round spherical closed form potter's wheel

pottery technique round spherical closed form potter's wheel brushwork hand painted

pottery technique round spherical closed form potter's wheel slip finger wipe

pottery technique round spherical closed form potter's wheel brush work vine botanical

wood kiln results showing spherical pots alex Matisse and teapot
A finished spheroid. This one is currently in the Union University show. 

[and what would a blog post about spheres be without tipping my pottery bloggery millenary towards the sphere that inspired me so many years ago as a young artiste in Knoxville, TN?]

Knoxville TN sunsphere World's Fair architectural tower
the Sunsphere 

Chuck

Michael Kline


Ha, I'm still here, still hungry after two tomato sammies! I've moved on to another favorite, crackers, cheese, and pickles. Anyhow, I forgot to post a picture of the chuck I used to cut the feet on the spheres. The little recess in the bottom allowed me to cut the ones with the necks.

Round Revisited

Michael Kline

As I eat my tomato sandwich (and write this) I am scratching my head about this investigation of "round" As a potter I am partial to the bottom set, but as someone who wants to follow through with an idea, I favor the top two. So I am at odds with this project. I don't know why I was surprised at one point to realize that to make these as perfect spheres, a lathe may have been a better tool, or for that matter, why not make a mold of a ball? But I guess that since I am a potter using wheels, this is how I approach the making. And it's the pottery-ness in these that I find most interesting, the reference to sphere, the neck/foot relationships, etc. To make a perfect sphere, it would be a lot easier to get a bowling ball and paint it, wouldn't it? So I will keep going with more.

I really appreciate you all stepping up to give me your impressions and even your own experience with similar projects. Don't be shy.

Thanks.

[Sandwich done, blog post done, back to work.]