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192 Jim Boone Rd
Bakersville, NC, 28705
United States

828-675-4097

The central information hub for Michael Kline Pottery, a small one man shop of pottery making in the mountains of western North Carolina.

Thanks for visiting.

The Best of Sawdust and Dirt

A record of the goings on around Michael Kline Pottery!

Filtering by Tag: painting

Painting Video--Rough Draft

Michael Kline

I'm loading my kiln today, but managed to have Lillian take some video of my brushwork. I think I need another take or two, but for now I thought it would be nice to share this with my readers as an advance rough-cut, and when I am finished firing I will put these together in a more polished version.



 I will be in Seagrove this coming weekend for the 10th Annual Cousins in Clay. More info on that show can be found here! I hope to see some of you who can make it.

Some Painted Pots and The Village Potter

Michael Kline

All the pots are bisqued
and the glaze is stirred
 I picked up my brush...

the last bisque with glaze test tiles for Courtney Martin
natures patterns are everywhere! even in a bisque firing!


step by step vine instructions (clockwise)
more pattern, less negative space


Ahh, can't finish this!  (to the tune of Mingei-sota Dreaming, or is that California Dreamin'???)

Staying up late painting pots has once again dulled my recall.

I strive, (I really do!) each session, to refine my painting, to push it to a slightly different place. I guess it might look like the same old @klineola ware, but i hope the patterns are more nuanced, more fluid each time.

I like these just the way they are but the glaze and firing will make these functional and add another layer of subtlety.

coffee break with my newish  Matthew Schiemann mug

Way behind schedule, but, as promised, a few pics of my painting progress, and a link to a great article I just read while taking my coffee break!

Read about the island of misfit pots: The Village Potter



OK! Back to work!

Deco-Rotation Beginnings

Michael Kline


I'm afraid I might be painting myself into a corner (again)!

Just back from conferencing, yet again, and not enough time to get all the ideas that I've had for surface treatments onto all of these pots. Oh my.

But I'm off to a good start, though, and the brushes feel good. New things always happen and its hard to hold back from trying new motifs, etc. But time is always the party pooper.

So, I'll be brief and get back to the bisque straight away. I'll continue to post regularly here and might try to put down some thoughts during this sit-down-and-paint-some-pots day or two.

Thanks for reading.

snowed last night and the studio light is very bright. :-)

Mark Making:Painting: José Parlá video

Michael Kline

Sometimes, here on the internet, someone [thanks David Ernster] will share content with you with a kind of perfect timing. A timing that parallels something you might be thinking about and validates. As I sit here painting pots I was thrilled to hear what José Parlá says about mark making and language. I thought I would share this video with you so when you find it it might speak to you as well.


Form Factor--Design Challenge

Michael Kline


Evelyn had some leftovers when we ate out recently and it came in this nice paper container. When I saw this, I immediately rescued it from the paper recycling bin with the intention of painting it. It was a real challenge. First of all, the paper has a light coating that my ink didn't immediately dry, so I had to do some dabbing with tissue. Also it was slow to dry, so I used my torch, not so good. ;-) but the challenge was stimulating!

If only I had a whole stack of these, I could really work out/sketch out some variations in pattern that might include some of the eccentricities of the form.

It's amazing that this establishment uses paper for take out. Most places use styrofoam. It's really a shame, isn't it? I will go back to the restaurant and get the same of the supplier.

paper cup


On the Wall

Michael Kline

One more from today about things that pile up and so on.

In the course of a session in the studio, my wedging table gradually gathers various bags of clay, throwing bats, stuff. In the coming days I will begin to paint and glaze.

I painted the wall several years ago and painted the cardboard box a few months ago. Mostly I forget the stuff on my walls as I focus in on the objects I make, but the wall is sort of a subconscious reminder of what I like to do, decorate!

I liked how the pattern on the wall looks like its growing out of the bottle.

Half Baked

Michael Kline

pots and slip ready for this weeks painting and glazing

Tomorrow begins the clumsy transition between the wetness and sloppiness of shaping pots at the Shimpo to the dressing up with patterns of carefully painted wax resist brushwork. Pottery making is full of paradoxes and the dance between the impermanence of damp clay and the rock hardness of the fired pot usually has me standing with my back to the wall, waiting for the right song to inspire me to the dancefloor. Always a little shy and wallflowerish, I'm reluctant to let go of my slippery spinning world of forming for the whirling of the brush mark on the lovely beautiful pink bisque. I wonder why?

Ha!

Bisqueware stands somewhere between its ceramic puberty and its vitrified adulthood, always a little awkward, uncomfortable in this transitive state.  Impatient as a not-yet-old-enough teenager to drive.



Q/A

Michael Kline

from Facebook
Hi Brett,

It all depends. Some weeks I'm very productive and some weeks things go slowly. At the beginning of my session before a firing, I may make a handful of pots a day. Closer to the firing deadline, I'm filling up tables, checking off my make list. Ironically, when I'm at the top of my throwing game (like now!) it's time to stop making! I should have stopped making pots last week, but my make list says that I still need so many of "x, y, and z". The compounded effect of this deadline kind of thinking is that the last minute making steals from the time I need to paint and glaze the existing pots and then steal again when they, too, want to be decorated. The image in my mind to describe this is one you might be familiar with. You know when there is an traffic jam on the interstate and everybody politely is waiting, then somebody decides that they are more important than the rest and passes  in the breakdown lane to get to the front? That's what the pots that I made yesterday will be doing to get into the kiln by Friday.

So to answer your question (or not) it varies. I try to average about 20 pots of various sizes a day. I also try to balance pots that require trimming and post-wheel work with pots that just have to be turned over to dry.

I'm not very good at making pots and decorating at the same time, so I tend to "stockpile" my bisque ware and sit down for a week before the loading and firing of the kiln surrounded by stacks of plates, jars cups, etc. All of them waiting for some sort of decorative treatment. Once I get rolling the intimidation of that many pots melts away and the exhilaration of painting patterns  becomes exciting.

So, Brett, I hope that approximates a good answer to your question.

Here are a few pots I've made in the last couple of days. 




Klinet

Michael Kline

I painted a few paper plates that went out to some of my star customers from last week's Etsy Sale.

It's a great way to keep the brushes limber while there aren't any pots to paint. I hope to take this technique on the road to my upcoming workshops in NYC and CT. More on those soon.

Want a plate? Buy a pot!

Today I start making pots. Film at 11.



Guess who?

Falling and Painting Walls

Michael Kline

wearing my brand new Ron Philbeck T.

I spent yesterday afternoon painting a couple of the gallery walls at Crimson Laurel Gallery in Bakersville in prep for Stacey and my show that is hopefully all set up as of today. [that's one sentence y'all]

The wall was covered in red dirt clay from my field, but only after I tripped over some short black pedestals just inside the back door entrance to the gallery and spewed my clay ALL over the display along those walls. As I came tumbling down the clay went flying and I ended up with a welt the size of Texas on my shin. Not a good way to start a day. The irony was that as I set to spreading the remaining clay on the wall inside our gallery, David, John, and Deb cleaned the floor, the walls, the ceiling, and all the pots out in the hallway. [You'll be happy to know that no pots were broken during my Chevy Chase moment.]

I'm back at it with the red dirt this morning, making jars and pitchers. Last wet day is Saturday, also the day of the reception at CLG. Hope you can make it and see the completed walls in all of their snake-ified, bird-ified, and moth-ified glory!

(Oh, and the pots and jewelry, too!)

Deco-Rotation

Michael Kline






Just enough time this morning to show some pictures of yesterday's painting highlights! Glazing today, loading the wood kiln in the 'morrow.

Congratulations to Michael Alvis for winning last week's comment contest. It's so much fun, we'll give away another $20 gift certificate soon. Look for the announcement and tell your pottery loving friends.

Have a great day.

Michael Kline



I'm glazing and loading the eKiln today. Firing tomorrow! It will be a light load, read: totally-experimental-glaze-test-slip-test kind of firing with real pots.

Call me crazy or call me over-confident! [See fingers crossed behind my back.]

But this is how I'm rolling into the fifth year of pottery bloggery.

New Slips

Michael Kline

Tea time with my Dan Finnegan Tea Stein! I'm also testing some different black slips that may work at cone 7. The Lug-1 black underglaze was recommended by Kyle. It seems a little thin and it may a watercolor look. Also mixed up a new base slip and added the mason stain 6666. Instead of EPK I am using redart and am looking to use a little less of the pricey stain. Loading the eKiln this afternoon!