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192 Jim Boone Rd
Bakersville, NC, 28705
United States

828-675-4097

The central information hub for Michael Kline Pottery, a small one man shop of pottery making in the mountains of western North Carolina.

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The Best of Sawdust and Dirt

A record of the goings on around Michael Kline Pottery!

Filtering by Tag: eating

Clean Plate vol. 3

Michael Kline


This little plate was just the vehicle for a heaping helping of my buddy Eric's handmade sauerkraut. It's really coming into its peak flavor and crispiness! The kraut was just what I needed after a little upset stomach this afternoon. And it was so nice to clean this fine dish made by my blogging buddy, Hannah McAndrew! I feel better from all of these wonderful things in my life.

Clean Plate #2

Michael Kline

Turns out I eat lunch pretty much every day, just like drinking coffee in the morning. While I can't promise to take pictures and blog about it every day, I will until I run out of time or plates.
before





after
I almost imagined that the bird would peck at the crumbs left on the plate!  This plate is from firing XXXII. It was combed and painted, glazed with my amber glaze and is usually perched in our cupboard because of a little firing crack on the rim.

OK, back to making pots!

Clean Plate # 1

Michael Kline

As seen earlier on Facebook
I didn't want to leave anyone out, namely, non-Facebookers. If you've wondered where everyone has gone, or if you're ready to "cave" go to this link, you won't turn into a pillar of salt. [You don't have to join Facebook to see the content that I put up there. Unfortunately you won't be able to leave comments there unless you join.]

I hesitate to call this the first in a new series, but here I go. Pots always look better with food on them, don't they?

Satisfying!
The rewarding view of a clean plate!

Chuck

Michael Kline


Ha, I'm still here, still hungry after two tomato sammies! I've moved on to another favorite, crackers, cheese, and pickles. Anyhow, I forgot to post a picture of the chuck I used to cut the feet on the spheres. The little recess in the bottom allowed me to cut the ones with the necks.

Rock Creek Bowl

Michael Kline

copy cat bowls
[with original]
made after lunch


There is something about using a good pot that makes me want to make it. What is that impulse? Maybe trying to figure out how it can be so good, work so well? Sometimes I need a springboard to get the pottery flowing.

For lunch today I fixed a fettuccine with egg and feta cheese. Something simple and nice for Stacey and I. Stacey was working on her jewelry in her little workshop outside our house and I wanted something hot, but quick. Well, it wasn't that quick but it was simply tasty! I chose a Rock Creek Bowl that was just the right size. It fit on the table between our plates held the 3/4 lb of fettuccine for the two of us. After I cooked and drained the pasta I put it in this bowl and poured the two beat eggs in and tossed. Then I covered the bowl with a big Philbeck goat plate and waited a couple of minutes, checked email, whatever. The I tossed it again and by now the egg was just cooked and covered the pasta. Yum.

I tossed in 3/4 c crumbled Feta cheese, plenty of black pepper, and salt. It was so good that we got a good look at the empty bowl and it's odd design and its 'desert storm' palette.

Rock Creek Pottery, circa 1998

It has a shino like glaze that is ladled on or poured on in these nice little areas that break up the space of the bowl quite nicely. It was slipped and salted to a smooth sheen. Then there are these amber dots that are somewhat quarantined within four quick little brush strokes that form a kind of square. These brush strokes are done in such a way that gives the squares a kind of speed or movement. It is sort of a bird's eye view, sort of a map. The bowl has a paradoxical visual weight but feels just right. [what I mean is] The outside of the bowl is cut evenly and disregards the inside profile. The inside of the bowl was ribbed into two 'zones'. Well, there are two areas formed by the ribbed ridge. The bottom inside of the bowl is almost flat and then sweeps up to the ridge line before it sweeps up to the rim. It is cut/trimmed almost all of the way from the foot ring, which is quickly and squarely done, to the rim. The clay is lightly salted, orange in spots and dry in spots. The clay seems to have some sand which breaks up the smooth surface and gives it a subtle texture where the clay is cut. There was another small pot fired and wadded inside the bowl and it left a nice three point mark.

Well, I guess that's why I had to try to make this pot. It's too soon to tell as to my success or failure. As in many good pots, the proportions are very subtle. The timing of the lunch , picking the bowl, and my abundance of soft clay ready to be turned, conspired with my desire for this bowl. Maybe the fettuccine had something to do with it, too? We potters, should try to eat better, and use the best pots available. It certainly doesn't hurt!