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192 Jim Boone Rd
Bakersville, NC, 28705
United States

828-675-4097

The central information hub for Michael Kline Pottery, a small one man shop of pottery making in the mountains of western North Carolina.

Thanks for visiting.

The Best of Sawdust and Dirt

A record of the goings on around Michael Kline Pottery!

Filtering by Tag: decoration

Deco-Rotation Beginnings

Michael Kline


I'm afraid I might be painting myself into a corner (again)!

Just back from conferencing, yet again, and not enough time to get all the ideas that I've had for surface treatments onto all of these pots. Oh my.

But I'm off to a good start, though, and the brushes feel good. New things always happen and its hard to hold back from trying new motifs, etc. But time is always the party pooper.

So, I'll be brief and get back to the bisque straight away. I'll continue to post regularly here and might try to put down some thoughts during this sit-down-and-paint-some-pots day or two.

Thanks for reading.

snowed last night and the studio light is very bright. :-)

A Motif-ated Dish Towel

Michael Kline




The week ahead has a lot of painting in store, so I am thinking of motifs and pattern. I found these motifs on a dish towel that use everyday.

Also, Diana Fayt's online surface design workshop begins tomorrow and lasts for 6 weeks. Check out the Clayer web site. It's not to late to sign up!

Lot's to do and see this week, I hope you'll check in again. Thanks for reading.

Randomness and A Giveaway

Michael Kline


Here are some tankards that I poured slip over, leaving some random bare clay between pours. This may be a case of necessity as the muse.


My bucket of slip wasn't quite deep enough for the full dip and I opted to pour. My reaction was really positive after seeing the pattern created from the missed areas. I've done this before, and I know a lot of folks who do this as well. Kyle Carpenter does a nice job of this kind of pour.

What do you think of these?

Leave a comment and qualify for this week's $20 gift certificate! The drawing will be held this weekend if I can get Evelyn and Lillian to do their thing! That should be the easiest thing I've done all week!



;)


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From Where I Sit

Michael Kline


Here's a quick view of some of the pots I've painted for the upcoming firing. I will try to keep you informed of the other pots I've painted as well as some source images from one of my favorite pottery books before the holiday break!

But for now it's lunchtime and then more brush play!

Questions? Leave a comment! Thanks.




Pots & Chores

Michael Kline


I finally finished my pots yesterday after slacking with other things and I needed a little warm up to my brushwork ahead and
painted a bunch of invitations to the studio tour coming up on December 3, 4, 5! Are you on my mailing list? [sign up here]

I also cut some wood that is too big/wide to stoke in the wood kiln, but makes nice heat for the house and studio. Nothing is wasted here! Unfortunately this makes for a lot of various pile of wood around the kiln yard. But I developed a pretty quick way of cutting and stacking.


I'll be deco-rotating the pots for the next few day until I haul them over the hill to load with Courtney next week. I will send images of some of the motifs that emerge from the session.
Digg Button

Have a great weekend.

Patterns 'n' Plates

Michael Kline


Painting plates as the Chilean miners are being rescued! The orange painted areas in the image above is a wax resist that is tinted with orange ink. Then a thin wash of black slip was brushed over the resist.

We'll load the kiln over at Courtney's on Thursday! Here are some more pictures.







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Painting Memo

Michael Kline



I'm well into some painting and have been exploring inside/outside pattern. It is something I began last spring with a sawed off brush for the inside and a regular brush on the outside. I begin on the inside and follow the lines over the lip of the cup or bowl. In the case of my flat-bottomed tumblers and breakfast cups, I even continue the pattern on the bottom. Having fun and wanted to share the thoughts. But there is a lot of pottery to paint, so I'm off to my station! Hope you are well!

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Tom Turner: Part 2: Salt Glazed

Michael Kline


If I had taken more notes and been a better student I could then pass on more information to you about the pots in this post. But as it stands, it's been over a week since I visited Tom and looked at these pots and I didn't have my notebook with me.

One important thing that happens, though, when handling pots or objects of any kind is a sort of downloading of non-verbal information. Textures, weights, shapes become internalized and this data is kept in hand memory and visual memory. We become scanners and cameras as we handle and turn these objects. You don't have to be a potter to do this. All of us handle hundreds of objects every day. Our relationship with any object is the product of these sensory interactions merging with our own needs and desires. We need a cup of tea or coffee, we desire that particular cup. The necessity of food and eating for survival is the primary job for which pottery exists, the culture of that pottery is lead by our desire for function and style. The available technology at any given time in history is the catalyst for expression in the art of the potter.

Although I don't consider myself a scientist, I am infinitely curious. This curiosity leads me to answer questions that I have in my work as a potter. As a contemporary potter I am fortunate to have examples of previous potter's research available in collections like Tom's, like the Mint Museum's, and others, like the Freer/Sackler. In any research discovery stands on the shoulders of the past. Unfortunately, a lot of what I do in the studio is redundant in the search for these answers.
I'm not sure, yet, how to minimize this. But continuing to study is crucial.
No matter if you are making pottery or sculpture, no matter if you are new to clay or a veteran, it is essential to the success of your work to know the history. We may be doomed to repeat the failures of the past, I know I have, but we can also enjoy the satisfaction of perpetuating good ideas and good forms with our work.
I meant to talk more specifically about the marks on some of these pots, but I've gone on a tangent. Last week, Tom and I were were looking at handles, their attachments, and capacity marks. These images show a few ways of marking and embellishing.


In the process of answering questions about these pots we learn about the needs and desires of the people who made them and the culture that surrounded them. In turn, we learn about our own needs and desires, both as potters and as people. Thanks Tom for sharing.

I'd better get myself in that studio and make some pots today! Thanks for indulging.


Tom showing proper form when holding an old pot

***Click here to see another Stedman/Seymour pot you might find very interesting. I can't imagine what it was for or how it might have been used. Maybe you have an idea?