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192 Jim Boone Rd
Bakersville, NC, 28705
United States

828-675-4097

The central information hub for Michael Kline Pottery, a small one man shop of pottery making in the mountains of western North Carolina.

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The Best of Sawdust and Dirt

A record of the goings on around Michael Kline Pottery!

Filtering by Tag: cups

More Comb and Rope

Michael Kline

See this image on Instagram- http://www.instagram.com/klineola
previously seen on Instagram

Last night I attacked a table full of plastic, several days of 12's, and finally trimmed these little cups as well as bowls and  plates. I practically ran to my bucket of #6 Tile slip to dunk these. You might call it March madness!

This week is off to a snowy, no-school start, but it feels like it might be a explosively productive one! We'll see!

Time To Clean The Shop Pots

Michael Kline





After the Firing, or as it became known in Stonepool parlance as ATF, is that special time reserved for all the things that should have been done, if it weren't for the rigorous demands leading up to a wood firing. Because after the firing there's the waiting.

One of the things that I managed to do today in my dazed-zombie-potter state was to bring the mugs down from the shop for their periodic washing. Coffee, morning noon and night, delivered by these great and noble cups, helped me make it through this unreasonable workload of a cycle.

Like a lot of folks, my dad drank coffee to make it through his work day. Lots of it. It's just one thing we had in common. He was born on this day on 1929. I really do miss him.

Info-mercial Contest: The Winning Entry

Michael Kline



Here is the winning entry for Kline Pottery's first ever info-mercial! Joe Arnold and Katrina Plato of Bakersville, NC put this fantastic homage to the breakfast cup together! Now I hope I can keep up with all the orders that are going to flood in as soon as it gets aired on our local cable station!

Thanks Joe and Katrina. Let me know when you all need some more Breakfast cups!!

Shop Cups Contest

Michael Kline


I'm wrapping up the deco-rotation, and set to dip the pots in slip and glaze. But first it's time for one more coffee break. Here are my choices tonight. How many can you name?

The first one to name all the cups correctly gets a special prize. When I get the right answers I will announce the winner!

- Posted using BlogPress from my iPhone

As The Crow Flies

Michael Kline


Here are a few items that will be in the Artisan Gallery show, "As the Crow Flies: NC Neighbors" that opens next week in Northampton, MA. The show features my work and the work of my "over the hill" neighbors, Michael Hunt and Naomi Dalglish. They may be over the hill as a crow flies, but far from over the hill with their pots!




Who's Counting?

Michael Kline

Rather than speculating on the success of yesterday's phenomenon that is the Akar Yunomi Show, I've decided to just give you a few numbers (provided by Akar via their Facebook page).

  • 240 cups sold in the first 14 minutes
  • 500 cups sold in the first hour
  • 686 cups sold in 12 hours
The Big Cojones prize goes to Elaine and Tom Coleman with the highest priced cups, $350. The Low Baller's prize goes to Victoria Christen, who edged out Kent McLaughlin for the cheapest cup, at $25. It seemed that all price points sold, not just the low end, although the most common price seemed to be around $30.

North Carolina had the most potters (of course) with 24 and here are the other tallies:

MT 12
MA 11
IL, NY, PA 10
GA 8
CO, MN, VA 7
TX, UT, WI 6
CA, IA, OH 5
MO, MI, Canada,AZ, IN 4
CT, OR, KY, NE, FL, WA 3
MD, SC, VT, MS 2
KS, LA, WV, NM, AK, NH, ID, DC 1

mia- HI, NJ, ND, SD, AL, TN, ME, RI, DE, OK

simple math:
194 potters x 5 cups
=970 cups

[i can't guarantee these numbers as
I was counting them by hand on my
screen, but you get the point.]


That means that there are still about 300 cups to get!

Many galleries have tried their hand at this type of show with marginal success. But Sanjay Jani and his Akar Design have put their time into this show. This is no overnight success. They have been doing this show for several years and have fined tuned the event with top notch presentation and most importantly a wide range of excellent potters. Additionally, it's no small feat to take the time and put in the resources to photograph and input the data for the web site and continue to present the work so well. Then there is the bandwidth for the server to handle the massive rush of traffic when the online show opens. Well, I could go on...

But in the end, who doesn't like a cup? It's really the love of the cup that drives the folks at Akar, and the many who sit down at their computers to buy them. The cups in this years show are as diverse as we are as a culture. Most of our cabinets are probably overflowing with cups, but that doesn't stop us from adding to our collections. Pots break, or they get tired, better one comes along, our habits change, or we seek a different texture or color. And as we evolve in either our taste or our depth as collectors, hopefully there will be a pot that fits our needs and a potter out there to make it.

This show will continue to grow and include future generations of potters. At least I hope it does. It's one of the few events each year that truly embody the excitement that I have for pottery. As Sue Weisenburger commented on Akar's FB page, "[It's] One of my favorite 5 minutes of the year!"



My fellow POTR Stan Andersen's beautiful cup!
7 out of 15 of our guild were in the show!

Did you buy a cup? Did you have a favorite cup in the show? Were there surprises? Let us know with a brief comment. Thanks!

Now back to pottery making!

One Rather Long Ramble: Or Am I Going To Ever Going To Get Back to the Wheel?

Michael Kline

Somehow it all makes sense I guess. There are things in your life that have their influence on you, people, pots, and finger paintings! I just saw this drawing as I was putting together this morning's post and thought, "oh, that's interesting." It could be that I'm drawing conclusions or implying that this drawing has influenced me in some subconscious way when really it just hangs on the door that we go in and out of all through the day. Now I'm confusing myself. Anyway you can draw your own conclusions or draw your own finger painting, or just draw!


When I was at Highwater Clays the other day I bought a bag of Grolleg kaolin for my #6 Tile kaolin slip. Go figure. I call it T6 slip, but it has a little bit of Grolleg in the recipe. It's a recipe I got from Linda Christianson somewhere down the road. It worked really well, so why change a good thing? Well that bag of Grolleg kaolin was $44! Yes, I know it is from England. Yes I know it probably one of the world's best clays. But come on!! I tell myself that it's just a small portion of the recipe and the bag will last a long time. But come on! I putting it on dirt! Oh well. If it works is there a reason to fix it?

[In researching this post, it turns out that all dry materials have gone ¡way! up. Did you notice this, or am I just a little slow to catch on? The Grolleg is actually ¡cheaper! than the #6Tile!! See for yourself...]

I digress.

Where were we?

Oh yes, I pour the slip on the slabs, spin the bat that the slab is on, and then comb away.


Here is the hump mold just after I have shaped a dish. You can still see the ghost image of the combed slip. Below are the molded dishes aprés Bandana. Stacey thought they looked too much like Michael and Naomi's pots. I said, "Oh good!!" I don't think she knew that it was covers week here at the pottery. And what would be so wrong about that, anyway? I guess this idea of originality is a problematic one for us potters.

I also saw some nice doodlings from Dylan Bowen. You can see for yourself. It's a doodle thing! (aka what goes around, comes around)

On to more formal thoughts, or more well formed thoughts, anyway. [damn, ever since Simon's post yesterday, I've been trying to be as clever, sorry, I'll leave the irony to Mr. Levin]

Here is a bottle/vase/call-it-what-you-will, on a specially made chuck for trimming. This series of pots started out as a cover of the Bruce Gohlson "big gulp" yunomi the other day and by the second board of 'em it had morphed into this shape. To see the bottle/vase just hold your monitor upside down, or stand on your head, or scroll down, whatever is more fun, or easier, your choice...
The cup shape grew into a vase shape quite naturally.

Here are a couple that asked for ears!

After that I was back at the treadle wheel for some more trimming. I took the still soft chuck I used for the bottle/vases and reshaped the top to accommodate the MSimon cup covers! The updated chuck's effectiveness was marginal but it worked and I got them done.



The feet were tricky. I soon found that I had looked closely at the finished fired cup when throwing these, but hadn't looked closely enough at the foot. For most of these I had left too much clay in bottoms which needed a lot careful tweaking to get the cups where they wanted to be. A process that made the feet look a little overwrought. Most of them were taller and narrower in proportion than the original.

This one had the nice profile, a decent weight, and the foot was close, but a far cry from Mr. Simon's. The scale is a little off.

;-)

The scale is one of the things I like about Michael's cup. It's volume is very specific to my coffee in the morning or a good gulp of water. My version will hopefully find a home where it is "just the thing".

For me, it's back to the drawing board, or rather, back to the wheel! It's getting on noon and here I am at a keyboard!


Don't forget to take this weeks poll! Just a few hours left! Scroll down and you'll find it on the right hand sidebar. Thanks.

Just One More Board

Michael Kline



I totally know where Joe and Cristy are coming from. Not necessarily from a triathalete/potter's point of view, but when you're making pots and have to stop to glaze and fire a kiln, it's not as easy as flipping a switch. It was such a breezy day yesterday that I turned these cups out before supper, came back and they were just right for dipping in the 6 tile slip! How 'bout that?

But, meanwhile back in reality land, there is still a bunch of pots that need leaves. Maybe I should get Sophia to wax them?!

Oh, and by the way, this jar was the only one that cracked during the fast drying in the sun/wind! Not bad, but don't you think the handles look a lot like it's cousin "rubbermaid"? Coincidence? Probably not. Be careful of what you have in your studio. It might end up influencing what you make!

;-0

Ring and Things

Michael Kline

drinking from life's big cup!

I'm back from the trip and sitting in the S &D offices here in Bakersville. Ahh, home sweet home. I got back and remembered this picture that shows my lovesome sporting some fancy rings. The engagement ring was made by Jones/Doran of Kutztown (when they lived back here in Saluda, NC). It was great to see them on my trip and stay with them and their lovely children in their great big house!

Stacey and I celebrated our 8th anniversary yesterday! Yay! The girls did victory laps around our house, one for each year of our marriage!

Follow Up and Apologies

Michael Kline


I'm sorry for not getting back to you sooner and not posting for several hours now. ["Geez, slacker", you might say.] But here is the result of the the suggestions I recieved from Kyle, Jerry, and Brandon. As you can see I took the majority advice and stuck with one handle. Sippy cup kept ringing in my ears! I did take liberties, though, of applying the handle on the left, as you can plainly see. I think it's only fair to give those lefties their due.

;-)


cups on the top row are for the ambidextrous,
the row below are clearly for the right brained.

Ok, here is the rack with big breakfast cups that I handled after supper. The amber glazed cup at the right is the prototype. These should hold, when fired, a tall grande latte from your neighborhood barista.

There you have it. Tomorrow is another day and another month. Lillian will turn 5 in four days. I will get to some brushwork real soon. The bisque kiln is still rolling and I will most likely have a few pots that will have to be raw glazed.

Did I mention that this firing is primarily for my solo show at Leslie Ferrin Gallery in Pittsfield, MA ? More on my history with the Ferrin Gallery soon and other cool stuff. Nighty night.