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192 Jim Boone Rd
Bakersville, NC, 28705
United States

828-675-4097

The central information hub for Michael Kline Pottery, a small one man shop of pottery making in the mountains of western North Carolina.

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The Best of Sawdust and Dirt

A record of the goings on around Michael Kline Pottery!

Filtering by Tag: collecting pots

Tom Turner: Part 1: China

Michael Kline

bowl from Lonquan, China with celadon glaze

Tom came back from his stay in Jingdezhen, China last month, but it was a busy time for me and I couldn't get over to see him and the pots and books he brought back until Monday. Tom's house is jammed packed with pots from all over and he's always getting new pots from his travels or from eBay. Here are just a few of the pots Tom brought back from China. I've already shared one with you all earlier today.

Brandon was right in his speedy blog comment. It is a sagger that got a little too hot. Although you can't see from that photo, the bottom of the sagger isn't flat, but is somewhat conical shaped. So the space around the pot was minimal both above and below. Here is a description from Wikipedia of sagger:
Saggars are boxlike containers made of high fire clay or specialized fireclay which are used to enclose pots needing special treatment in the kiln. The word "saggar" is thought to have come from the word "safeguard."[1] Historically, reusable saggars were used to protect or safeguard specialized glazes from open flame, smoke, gases and flying ash present in wood fired kilns. This technique was used to protect the surface of pottery in ancient China, Korea and Japan, and was popular in the industrial potteries of Great Britain. Saggars are still used for industrial ceramic production, shielding ware from variations in heat and kiln debris.
The next piece is curious in that is is considered a "disposable" container in China. It contained wine and these pots are very inexpensive to buy. Tom says that the factory claims to make 5000 a day! Look here to see a picture of a simple device they use at the factory to glaze the bottles quickly.
The next pot has a nice surprise for the beholder when they open it. Tom thinks it's a kind of cosmetic "kit". Discreet, delicate, and fits in your purse. Seems like I remember my mother having a jar with this shape that had a powder puff in it. I don't think it was ceramic, though. Mom if you're reading this...

Above Tom's fireplace I found this nice group of pots. From China on the left to Germany and then over to Japan for the figural pieces which I believe are Haniwa. I should have taken more notes so that I could tell you more about these pieces. Usually Tom doesn't leave comments! but maybe he'll chime in for the sake of accuracy (which he's really into, and good at) and set the record straight. I love the painting on the bottle on the left, the handles and lip of the solid black bottle, and the big dent in the jug. The jug has these subtle drippy/runny markings that you may pick up if you click on the image to enlarge. They're not just wine/food stains but are in the surface/salt glaze of the pot. Any ideas?
Tomorrow I'll continue with some 19th c stoneware in Tom's collection. The pots are from New England, New York, and Ohio and they're pretty cool. (if you're into old pots)


Here's a new feature for the blog, check out today's flashback post.

Pots in Action (On The Road)

Michael Kline

Lillian in Knoxville with vintage klineware in action!

As 2009 nears it's end, we rest between celebrations and I found time for a quick little post! We've had a wonderful stay in Knoxville with family for Christmas! We usually stay with Stacey's mother Jackie. My very supporting and loving mother-in-law Jackie has probably the second largest collection of klineware east of Great Falls, MT!

(That's where my Mom lives.)

;-)
Always on the prowl with the camera, wherever we go, I snapped a few corners in Jackie's house where my pots preside. I'm especially proud of this corner of the kitchen that has a few rare pots, the "ashes" and "knees" pots of some unknown craftsman, and a few of my oddities . The flat dish leaning against the wall is a molded dish that was supposed to be a square bowl, but when I flipped the drape mold over the clay slowly sat down flat. But it is a very popular dish at Jackie's. The jar in the corner was from an early firing of the wood kiln and is a little under fired, but not without its charms.

These two jars are from the first Etsy kiln opening. (see what I mean about Jackie's continued support!?) This is first time I saw these guys in action but I didn't have anything to do with the broken spoon. (disclaimer: as far as I know, the jars had nothing to do with the spoon's demise)

You can't tell it from this photo, but the platter in the foreground has been lovingly glued together. It's from my Penland residency days and is an early example of the cut rim edge I have been doing since then. The edges of this platter/bowl have some pretty bad cracks that Jackie has filled with some sort of wood filler or epoxy. It has some really nice painting of underglaze with an amber glaze on a light clay body.

We had a great time celebrating Jackie's 70th birthday the other night and there were even more Kline pots at my in law's home holding some really delicious "snacks"! Unfortunately I didn't get any pictures of the Colocotronis Collection of klineware. But it's in every corner. What great family support! In the beginning of most fledgling potters careers, the "friends and family" plan is what gives us the encouragement to keep going. After 22 some years I continue to be blessed with encouragement from my family and I'm most grateful.
Lastly, here's the dish rack at our house tonight as we take a break from the holiday party's and festivities and enjoyed some of Stacey's cauliflower soup on this cold winter's night. How many potters can you spot? (aside from the obvious klineware)

Well, we're off to our "New Year's Club" annual meeting tomorrow, so this could possibly be last post of 2009. It's been a unbelievable year. But I hope to do a wrap-up post before it's all over.

If I can't get to it before we leave,

Thank you for your support this year and thank you for making it a fantastic year here at ye olde blogge!!

and HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Additions to the Collection

Michael Kline

,4 new pots!

It's been a busy week of online commerce and Etsy-ness and I'm chomping to get back in the studio and to make some pots, already, YO! But, alas, there's more packing and shipping to do tomorrow. I've been a little under the weather today and just lazing around and doing paper work. I thought I would catch ya'll up on some new pots that have graciously entered our life here on Snow Creek Rd.

The beautiful little jug on the left came all the way over the ocean in Ron Philbeck's suitcase! Doug Fitch, my Devonshire blogging buddy sent it over! What a treat to be holding on to this sweet pot. I'm sure it will be of help when I get back to making pitchers! It has such a beautiful patina that I'm going to refrain from using the dishwasher and hand wash it. heehee. But it has already been host to some iron weed clippings we made while walking the puppy, Jack. It's a most welcome addition to the British wing in our museum!

walkin' the dawg

Lillian taking a swigg!

A few weeks ago a package arrived in the mail from New England! In it was this beautiful wood fired bottle with nice fish stopper from my old buddy Tom White. Tom's been making pots up there in Northfield, Massachusetts for a good while and recently has been firing the wood kiln over at Sam Taylor's place where this piece was fired. It has a most rich surface and holds a good bit of tea. (tee hee hee, that is)

Next in our lineup of super-star pots comes this yankee-mingei jar made by CT potter (as well as potter buddy), Louise Harter. We picked this little gem up at the Liz Summerfield Benefit Auction a couple of weeks ago. I love thinking of Louise wiping her fingers across this just dipped pot and freezing the moment with fire! Thanks for donating it to the cause Louise. We must talk soon, it's been too long!!

small jar by Michael Simon

Last but not least, it was my great surprise to find this jar at a local sale for our animal shelter. I spotted it across the crowded room as if it had a tractor beam of hotness transporting me towards it. It is pot made by my teacher and friend, Michael Simon! To seize the pot, I practically tackled the people that stood between me and the table where this little gem sat. I snatched it up and guarded it with my life as I approached the checkout table! Well, actually Stacey took it up to the check out table and threw down the bucks! [thanks sweetie] I'm the luckiest guy on earth! I am guessing it may have been made while Michael was teaching here at Penland as he did many times. I ran in to Paulus at the sale and he thought it was from the late eighties! Ha! In 1989 I took a pivotal spring concentration at Penland with Michael that changed my potters life forever. Hmmmmm. Maybe this jar was made during that workshop? Hmmmmmm. Wouldn't that be something?

Well, that's it for now. Just thought I would touch base with everyone who's out there reading and share these pots with you. I hope you'll come and visit our little corner of the world some day. When you do, let's sit down and look at some pots!