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192 Jim Boone Rd
Bakersville, NC, 28705
United States

828-675-4097

The central information hub for Michael Kline Pottery, a small one man shop of pottery making in the mountains of western North Carolina.

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The Best of Sawdust and Dirt

A record of the goings on around Michael Kline Pottery!

Filtering by Tag: Dan Finnegan

New Slips

Michael Kline

Tea time with my Dan Finnegan Tea Stein! I'm also testing some different black slips that may work at cone 7. The Lug-1 black underglaze was recommended by Kyle. It seems a little thin and it may a watercolor look. Also mixed up a new base slip and added the mason stain 6666. Instead of EPK I am using redart and am looking to use a little less of the pricey stain. Loading the eKiln this afternoon!



Going Down to Georgia

Michael Kline

We will be heading to Georgia tomorrow. Unfortunately, we won't be heading to the High Museum to see the terracotta warriors. Instead, we're going to spend New Year's Eve with some friends in Monroe where there will be much fun had by all, I'm sure. But, curiously, as I was flipping through my new book on Alabama Folk pottery I noticed these great pieces (below). They were made by John Lehman and one is in the High Museum's permanent collection. Ha! Lehman was born in Baden Germany in 1825 and made his way to the Southeast by late 1850's.
"Notwithstanding the efforts of art historians, collectors, and family descendants, tantalizingly few details of Lehman's life are known. According to family history, someone robbed and murdered him around 1883-84 while he was on a trip to Stockton, Georgia."

---excerpted from Alabama Folk Pottery, Joey Brackner, 2006, University of Alabama Press

"The[se] jugs are 22 and 23 3/4 inches in height and are ash glazed. Both are waist to head busts of an African or African American man in formal attire with large hoop earrings and a large belt buckle. Lehman's makers marks are stamped on the figure's lapels. The arms are hollow with small holes in each to prevent an explosion during the firing. These vessels have caused much excitement among collectors of southern pottery."

---from Alabama Folk Pottery, Joey Brackner, 2006, University of Alabama Press
Interesting. Coincidental?

Maybe I should add the face jug or "figural " jug to my making list when it comes time to make pots. I haven't made any since I was a college student. For some reason I have hesitated to enter the fray of face jug production , but these pieces are very interesting in a non-grotesque sort of way. After reading Dan's article about the subject of face "juggery", maybe it's OK. Never say never.

Here is another link to some Alabama pots.

Dreaming

Michael Kline

After talking with Ron yesterday, I realized how envious I am for all of the potters out there making pots and doing fine work and I'm thankful for everybody that writes a blog and tells their pottery story. Dan Finnegan had to remind me in an email yesterday that I am a potter, after all, not a carpenter-drywaller-painter! Although it's always good to have many diverse skills, its better, maybe, to focus on the core skills that make us who we are.

It's been a little over a year since I started this blog and I would have to say it has changed the way I look at my pots and pots in general. It's been a portal that takes me around the world to be a fly on the wall and watch how others make their work. I'm approaching my 500th post! I hope that I can continue to bring up interesting material and inspire others as well.

Progress in the new shop is slow, but I hope to be in there after the holidays, fingers crossed.
I hope everybody out there has a great weekend and keep making those beautiful pots.