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192 Jim Boone Rd
Bakersville, NC, 28705
United States

828-675-4097

The central information hub for Michael Kline Pottery, a small one man shop of pottery making in the mountains of western North Carolina.

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The Best of Sawdust and Dirt

A record of the goings on around Michael Kline Pottery!

Filtering by Tag: Asheville

Episode 2: Lindsay Rogers

Michael Kline


In this episode I talk with Asheville artist-potter, Lindsay Rogers.

We talk about moving to Asheville, NC, life after graduate school, and her work at Haywood Community College.

For you inside pottery listeners we talk about working alone vs in a group situation, commuting and the transition from home to studio. We discuss a video by the Portland Growler Company and Commercial/Industrial appropriation of the small scale/handmade which led to mention of David Pye’s discussion of the workmanship of risk vs workmanship of certainty.

More studio insider talk about how much to make, and producing numbers and Lindsay’s time working for Natchez, Mississippi potter Conner Burns Do deadlines kill spontaneity or do they give us structure in our workflow? I mention my sketching of pattern idea on paper plates and the intrinsic values of materials and creativity Lindsay describes the evolution of her current designs and the Bull and Beggar event

(Wanna go to the bull and beggar restaurant in Asheville, NC?)

You can find out more about Lindsay Rogers and her ceramics at her
LindsayRogersCeramics.com
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Today and Tomorrow

Michael Kline


After a couple of days of stoneware I hopped back on treadle wheel for my 12x12, this morning. The juggling act may be more than I am able to handle. The clays are so different. But it makes everything in the studio a little edgier, a little more challenging. But isn't making pots in the 21st century challenging enough? Couldn't I be content with the edginess that already exists in my studio? Turner claims that David Shaner only made porcelain in the winter when the snow was on the ground. I can totally relate to that instinct, but I am going to try to stretch it out into spring, maybe summer. I was talking to Kyle today and had the thought that another power wheel may just be the ticket, freeing up the treadle for trimming. Not in the budget (for now). Meanwhile I worked on Ellen Denker's newest post which I hope to upload for your reading pleasure very soon. Tomorrow is a wood cutting day with John followed by a mini road trip to the big city of Asheville for cornmeal and coffee. Actually, John and I are heading over to see Tom's new pots, then to Asheville to pick up some pots from American Folk Art, followed by a trip to Kyle carpenter's pottery empire to see the progress of his kiln rebuild. Then it's off to Alex Matisse's for the monthly gathering of the NC Clay Club!

Got all that? Maybe we'll see you somewhere along the line.

- Posted using BlogPress from my iPhone

American Folk Art Housecall

Michael Kline


American Folk Art owner Betsey-Rose Weiss (l) and her friend Patty came by this morning to pick up the work for the show. How's that for service? It was a beautiful crisp morning and we had a great time looking over the work that will be in my show opening Friday night in Asheville.

I know a lot of you will be in Southern Pines for the Clay 'n' Blogs Show, and I'm so sorry that I won't be there. And to everyone in the Asheville area, I hope to see you there. I can't wait to unveil some of my ink drawings that I made for the show. More later. Thanks!

Blue Birds, Chicks, and Bloggin'

Michael Kline

Spring break is behind us and the chicks were wild!

Even the bluebirds wanted in on some pottery fun!

But seriously, I have been curbing my enthusiasm for bloggering every little thing I do and have found it very productive!

Who would've known?
;-)

After a visit with Turner last week and some close examination of some alkaline glazed pots Catawbaware, I had the thought that some of these handles must have been thrown. It's quite possible that they were pulled, but I had a hunch about some of these. After some brief experience over the past few years of my fascination with this style handle, I thought there's no better way except to do.

here's the cylinder that I will cut the handle from.
I carefully scored with a needle tool. If you go too fast you may lose control of the soft clay and bang up the handle.
The cut handle layed out on the table to measure equal length for each handle.
A trial attachment.
The handle with a coil added to the upper part of the attachment and smoothed in.
Not bad to my eyes. But we'll see where this goes. The only drawback to this kind of handle is that it makes it harder (but not impossible) to balance a piece of glass on the handle to get a glass run in the glaze. But I like the lines and the thinner cross section of the handles. I think they will be easier to hold.

Back to it and then a trip to Asheville for a visit to Kyle's and then Clay Club at Odyssey!